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Modul (6 Credits)

Information Systems Research

Name im Diploma Supplement
Information Systems Research
Verantwortlich
Voraus­setzungen
Siehe Prüfungsordnung.
Workload
180 Stunden studentischer Workload gesamt, davon:
  • Präsenzzeit: 60 Stunden
  • Vorbereitung, Nachbereitung: 60 Stunden
  • Prüfungsvorbereitung: 60 Stunden
Dauer
Das Modul erstreckt sich über 1 Semester.
Qualifikations­ziele

Students should

  • understand methods’ and theories’ relevance for meaningful research;
  • have knowledge of the most common methods and theories used in IS research;
  • understand the core IS phenomena;
  • have a fundamental understanding of scientific research quality criteria;
  • be able to discuss scientific papers’ content;
  • be able to discuss scientific papers’ content;
  • be able to conduct basic empirical research projects.
Praxisrelevanz

The module prepares students for scientific work in the context of their master’s thesis. Moreover, data collection and analysis techniques discussed might also be used in strategic or consulting projects.

Prüfungs­modalitäten

Zum Modul erfolgt eine modulbezogene zusammengesetzte Prüfung in der Gestalt einer Klausur (in der Regel: 60-90 Minuten, 50% der Note) und mündliche oder schriftliche Testate (50 % der Note). Die genauen Formalia werden in der ersten Sitzung bekannt gegeben.

Verwendung in Studiengängen
  • WiInf-Ma-2010WahlpflichtbereichWahlpflichtbereich I: Wirtschaftsinformatik1.-3. FS, Wahlpflicht
Bestandteile
Name im Diploma Supplement
IS Research Fundamentals
Anbieter
Lehrperson
SWS
2
Sprache
englisch
Turnus
Wintersemester
maximale Hörerschaft
20
empfohlenes Vorwissen

There are no prerequisites for attending this course. 

Abstract

The lecture “IS Research Fundamentals” is designed to provide students with an opportunity to build the basic theoretical and methodological skills needed to conceptualize, conduct, and communicate their own research. To do so, the course will familiarize students with the essential research triad, namely topic, methods, and theories. While selecting an exciting topic is a fundamental anchor for the relevance of a research endeavor, a researcher’s ability to produce rigorous results depends on a sound command of the relevant theories and methods.

In this context, theories provide a solid basis by summarizing current knowledge and allowing for a precise investigation and definition of the topic’s underlying phenomena. Theories also provide students with a theoretical lens to investigate their topics from the perspective in which they are most interested. In addition, methods provide students with the ability to produce reliable results, thus allowing them to derive both meaningful and trustworthy conclusions. By applying appropriate theories and methods, students can therefore ensure that their results are not only interesting, but also scientifically valid.

Lehrinhalte
  • The What, How and Why: Scientific Thinking, Research Process, Philosophy of Science
  • Scientific Writing and Publishing: Paper structures, Publishing Process, Reviews (Exam)
  • Research Design I - Topics: Domains of IS, Fundamentals, Basic Research Design
  • Research Design II – Theories: Definition and Concepts, Building Blocks of Theories, Contributing to Theoretical Advancements
  • Research Design III – Methods: Important IS Research Methods, Data Collection, Data Analysis
Literaturangaben
  • Bacharach, S.B. 1989. "Organizational Theories: Some Criteria for Evaluation," Academy of Management Review (14:4), pp. 496-515.
  • Banker, R.D., and Kauffman, R.J. 2004. "The Evolution of Research on Information Systems: A Fiftieth- Year Survey of the Literature in Management Science," Management Science (50:3), pp. 281-298.
  • Bhattacherjee, A. 2012. Social Science Research: Principles, Methods, and Practices, (2. ed.). Tampa, FL, USA: Global Text Project.
  • Carpenter, M.A. 2009. "Editor's Comments: Mentoring Colleagues in the Craft and Spirit of Peer Review," Academy of Management Review (34:2), pp. 191-195.
  • Fettke, P. 2006. "State-of-the-Art Des State-of-the-Art: Eine Untersuchung der Forschungsmethode „Review“ Innerhalb der Wirtschaftsinformatik," Wirtschaftsinformatik (48:4), pp. 257-266.
  • Gregor, S. 2006. "The Nature of Theory in Information Systems," MIS Quarterly (30:3), pp. 611-642.
  • Kitchenham, B. 2004. "Procedures for Performing Systematic Reviews," Keele University, Department of Computer Science, Keele, UK.
  • Lepak, D. 2009. "Editor's Comments: What IS Good Reviewing?," Academy of Management Review (34:3), pp. 375-381.
  • Mingers, J. 2001. "Combining IS Research Methods: Towards a Pluralist Methodology," Information Systems Research (12:3), pp. 240-259.
  • Orlikowski, W.J., and Baroudi, J.J. 1991. "Studying Information Technology in Organizations: Research Approaches and Assumptions," Information Systems Research (2:1), pp. 1-28.
  • Palvia, P., Leary, D., Mao, E., Midha, V., Pinjani, P., and Salam, A.F. 2004. "Research Methodologies in MIS: An Update," Communications of the Association for Information Systems (14:24), pp. 526-542.
  • Straub, D.W. 2009. "Why Top Journals Accept Your Paper," MIS Quarterly (33:3), pp. iii-x.
  • Sutton, R.I., and Staw, B.M. 1995. "What Theory Is Not," Administrative Science Quarterly (40:3), pp. 371-384.
  • Truex, D., Holmström, J., and Keil, M. 2006. "Theorizing in Information Systems Research: A Reflexive Analysis of the Adaptation of Theory in Information Systems Research," in: Journal of the Association for Information Systems. Association for Information Systems, pp. 797-821.
  • Webster, J., and Watson, R.T. 2002. "Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review," MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.
  • Wilde, T., and Hess, T. 2007. "Forschungsmethoden der Wirtschaftsinformatik - Eine Empirische Untersuchung," Wirtschaftsinformatik (49:4), pp. 280-287.
didaktisches Konzept

Based on the selected readings, the course will also highlight some key theories used in IS research. Students will learn how the studies develop theories further (or will develop their own), how to use theories appropriately, as well as how to contribute to them. In addition, optional readings are provided for each session to facilitate students’ learning experience and to help deepen and extend the topics discussed in class.

Hörerschaft
Vorlesung: IS Research Fundamentals (WIWI‑C0654)
Name im Diploma Supplement
Academic Writing and Reviewing
Anbieter
Lehrperson
SWS
2
Sprache
englisch
Turnus
Wintersemester
maximale Hörerschaft
20
empfohlenes Vorwissen

There are no prerequisites for attending this course. 

Abstract

In this tutorial, students will develop their scientific skills further. Based on the lecture “IS Research Fundamentals,” students will do scientific work that consists of undertaking a small research project. Students are asked to design a research model, apply data collection and analysis techniques, and write a scientific documentation. The tutorial is typically structured into multiple parts that correspond to typical research phases, i.e. i) literature analysis, ii) model development, iii) research design, iv) data collection, v) data analysis and vi) documentation of results.

Lehrinhalte
  • Literature Review: Introduction, Reading-Based Discussion
  • Case Study: Introduction, Reading-Based Discussion
  • Survey: Introduction, Reading-Based Discussion
  • Writing reviews of scientific papers
  • Developing scientific papers
Literaturangaben
  • Bhattacherjee, A. 2012. Social Science Research: Principles, Methods, and Practices, (2. ed.). Tampa, FL, USA: Global Text Project.
  • Boudreau, M.-C., Gefen, D., and Straub, D.W. 2001. "Validation in Information Systems Research: A State-of-the-Art Assessment," MIS Quarterly (25:1), pp. 1-16.
  • Dubé, L., and Paré, G. 2003. "Rigor in Information Systems Positivist Case Research: Current Practices, Trends, and Recommendations," MIS Quarterly (27:4), pp. 597-635.
  • Eisenhardt, K.M. 1989. "Building Theories from Case Study Research," Academy of Management Review (14:4), pp. 532-550.
  • Gibbert, M., Ruigrok, W., and Wicki, B. 2008. "What Passes as a Rigorous Case Study?," Strategic Management Journal (29:13), pp. 1465-1474.
  • Gregor, S. 2006. "The Nature of Theory in Information Systems," MIS Quarterly (30:3), pp. 611-642.
  • Hsieh, J.J.P.-A., Rai, A., and Keil, M. 2008. "Understanding Digital Inequality: Comparing Continued Use Behavioral Models of the Socio-Economically Advantaged and Disadvantaged," MIS Quarterly (32:1), pp. 97-126.
  • Klein, H.K., and Myers, M.D. 1999. "A Set of Principles for Conducting and Evaluating Interpretive Field Studies in Information Systems," MIS Quarterly (23:1), pp. 67-93.
  • Lapointe, L., and Rivard, S. 2007. "A Triple Take on Information System Implementation," Organization Science (18:1), pp. 89-107.
  • Lee, G., and Xia, W. 2010. "Toward Agile: An Integrated Analysis of Quantitative and Qualitative Field Data on Software Development Agility," MIS Quarterly (34:1), pp. 87-114.
  • Leidner, D.E., and Kayworth, T. 2006. "Review: A Review of Culture in Information Systems Research: Toward a Theory of Information Technology Culture Conflict," MIS Quarterly (30:2), pp. 357-399.
  • Levina, N., and Vaast, E. 2008. "Innovating or Doing as Told? Status Differences and Overlapping Boundaries in Offshore Collaboration," MIS Quarterly (32:2), pp. 307-332.
  • Piccoli, G., and Ives, B. 2005. "IT-Dependent Strategic Initiatives and Sustained Competitive Advantage: A Review and Synthesis of the Literature," MIS Quarterly (29:4), pp. 747-776.
  • Pinsonneault, A., and Kraemer, K.L. 1993. "Survey Research Methodology in Management Information Systems: An Assessment," Journal of Management Information Systems (10:2), pp. 75-105.
  • Straub, D., Boudreau, M.-C., and Gefen, D. 2004. "Validation Guidelines for IS Positivist Research," Communications of the Association for Information Systems (13:24), pp. 380-427.
  • Urbach, N., Smolnik, S., and Riempp, G. 2009. "The State of Research on Information Systems Success," Business & Information Systems Engineering (1:4), pp. 315-325.
  • Wagner, E.L., Newell, S., and Piccoli, G. 2010. "Understanding Project Survival in an Es Environment: A Sociomaterial Practice Perspective," Journal of the Association for Information Systems (11:5), pp. 276-297.
  • Wallace, L., Keil, M., and Rai, A. 2004. "How Software Project Risk Affects Project Performance: An Investigation of the Dimensions of Risk and an Exploratory Model," Decision Sciences (35:2), pp. 289-321.
didaktisches Konzept

Students have to prepare for sessions by reading and summarizing selected seminal papers that provide deeper insights into methods and theories of IS research or exemplars thereof. At the end of the course, students will write their own reviews and papers based on the methods discussed in the module.

Hörerschaft
Übung: Academic Writing and Reviewing (WIWI‑C0655)
Modul: Information Systems Research (WIWI‑M0489)